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Birmingham Set For Carbon Neutral Skyscraper

Birmingham has undergone a number of major building projects in recent years, but the latest one has been projected to break new ground by creating the world’s first carbon-neutral skyscraper.

Developer Woodbourne Group has produced plans for the scheme, which have now gone for consultation. It will include three residential buildings and one office block.

All the buildings will have the most modern energy-efficient elements incorporated, enabling the buildings to achieve the holy grail of net carbon zero.

If approved, the scheme will cover one million sq ft of space and will stand on a plot on the northern edge of the city centre, close to Aston University and the A38 M Aston Expressway. There would be a 53-storey build-to-rent residential building rising to be 172 m (562 ft), making it the tallest in the city, plus a 41-storey student accommodation block and a 14-storey co-living building.

In addition, there will be 130,000 sq ft of office space and scientific research facilities and 15,000 sq ft of leisure space and public realm.

The height of the buildings will mean plenty of flat lifting slings will be needed to help the cranes carry materials to the elevated floors of the new structures.

Woodbourne Group chief executive Tani Dulay said:  “Curzon Wharf isn’t just a development, it’s a manifesto that will position Birmingham as UK’s leading smart and sustainable city, helping to pave the way for the UK’s Green Revolution.”

He added that the development “reinforces Birmingham’s position as Britain’s second city”.

This title is often disputed by Manchester, which currently has a much higher number of skyscrapers with more planned or under construction. However, Birmingham’s skyline is itself very much on the up, increasing the need for cranes, lifting slings and harnesses.

Birmingham’s tallest structure is the 498 ft BT Tower, which dates from the 1960s. However, it is set to be usurped by a number of new buildings, such as the 61-storey 100 Broad Street Tower, which gained planning permission last year.

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